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#1731 - 08/19/15 12:26 PM Re: Women joining Air Force Special Operations Units, your thoughts? [Re: denroy17]
Yukon Offline
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Registered: 11/16/14
Posts: 884
Loc: Anchorage AK
Paving the way for Battlefield Airmen By Volunteer in the Physical Fitness Tests and Standards Study , Air Education and Training Command Public Affairs / Published August 18, 2015


JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-RANDOLPH, Texas -- *Editors note-The following is a commentary by a female who completed a Physical Fitness Tests and Standards study at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas. The Airman was a volunteer in the fitness study, which supports the Air Force’s Women in Service Review. The study aims to scientifically establish occupationally-specific, operationally-relevant physical fitness standards for Battlefield Airmen. Since the study is ongoing, involving human subjects, the anonymity of volunteers is mandated by the Institutional Review Board.

There has been a lot of debate about whether or not females are capable of being successful in the last few ‘male only’ combat career fields. Reasons for skepticism range from doubts over physical capabilities, to concerns over how it would change unit cohesion, to how pregnancy might affect military readiness.

These uncertainties are not unique to today’s debate; they are the same concerns that have been raised throughout the history of women in combat.

In 1975, during debates over allowing women into the military academies, Lt. Gen. Albert P. Clark, Air Force Academy superintendent, said women were a potential threat to productivity and cohesion and that integration would lead to marriages, pregnancies and abortions.

In 1991, Congress voted to amend the law that barred women from flying combat missions, but according to an article in the New York Times, senior military officers were opposed because they claimed combat forces required superior physical strength and endurance.

Even as recently as 2012, just before the Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule was rescinded, the argument was made that allowing females in these roles would create “disruptions to cohesion and high rates of attrition,” according to congressional research conducted by David F. Burrelli, specialist in military manpower policy.

There will always be people who think women aren’t combat capable, but for two weeks, I got to spend my time sweating, bleeding and pushing myself with some of the most capable women I have ever met. Women who proved that no matter what standard is set or obstacles put in front of them, they will persevere.

Currently there are still six career fields in the Air Force that are closed to women known as Battlefield Airmen specialties: Special Tactics Officers, Combat Rescue Officers, Special Operations Weather Enlisted, Combat Control, Tactical Air Control Party and Pararescue. Recently, I had the chance to participate in an Air Force study to develop an operationally relevant fitness standard for these Battlefield Airmen.

Participants in the study were from all different career fields, male and female, but several were already Battlefield Airmen taking part to provide their feedback on the relevancy of the different exercises and how well the simulations mimicked combat situations.

Regardless of gender, career, ethnicity, age or any other extraneous factor, all participants were held to the same standard. We were given the same amount of weight to carry, the same distance to run, and the same objectives to meet.

It was not easy. There was one point where I literally hit a wall. It was the last day of the study and I had already pushed myself further than I thought possible. My heart was racing, my clothes were dripping with sweat, my feet were bleeding and that five foot wall seemed like an impossible obstacle.

As I stood there looking at this wall, trying to catch my breath and wondering how on earth I was going to do this, I heard someone yell out “come on, you’re bigger than that wall is!” They were right; I was bigger than the wall, and I was bigger than the pain I was experiencing in that moment. I gathered what little I had left in me and hoisted myself up and over that seemingly impossible roadblock…only to come face to face with an eight foot wall.

Sometimes I succeeded and sometimes I failed, but so did everyone. What got us through was that we did it together. Nobody cared if you were male or female, or what career field you were in; they cheered for you and motivated you to do your best as if we had been working together for years.

Opening the last few career fields to women should not be about whether females are physically capable or how pregnancy might affect operational readiness. It should be about maximizing our military capability by pulling from the most diverse group of qualified individuals we can to accomplish the mission.

Throughout history, women have proven that they have the ability, qualifications and drive to be included in combat roles. Those last six career fields are no different. During my two weeks participating in the Air Force’s study, success was not gender based; both men and women excelled.

The Air Force is dedicated to validating and maintaining the high standards for becoming a Battlefield Airman. At the end of the day, it’s not about whether you’re a man or a woman; it’s about allowing qualified individuals to make a difference for our nation.

----
The text emphasized in red is text book example of incorrect inference. The proposition "maximizing our military capability by pulling from the most diverse group of qualified individuals we can to accomplish the mission" is being used to assert physical capability (an element of human performance) and pregnancy (a lengthy 9 month plus medical condition that brings with it duty limitations and restrictions) have no impairment on individuals' ability and availability to successfully be there directly participating in accomplishing the mission. Being there ready and able is directly connected to individual combat readiness which further directly contributes to unit combat readiness.

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#1735 - 08/19/15 04:24 PM Re: Women joining Air Force Special Operations Units, your thoughts? [Re: Yukon]
Jay_Pew Offline
Apprentice

Registered: 02/22/15
Posts: 37
Loc: USA
I honestly hope the kind of stuff your are talking about and other important points brought up in this thread have been brought up at the highest levels discussing this.

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#1738 - 08/20/15 12:26 AM Re: Women joining Air Force Special Operations Units, your thoughts? [Re: Yukon]
AStelmack Offline
FNG

Registered: 08/14/15
Posts: 19
Loc: Grand Forks AFB, ND
Quote:
Throughout history, women have proven that they have the ability, qualifications and drive to be included in combat roles. Those last six career fields are no different. During my two weeks participating in the Air Force’s study, success was not gender based; both men and women excelled.


Examples of this would be great. Sure, I'd bet there were Spartan women here and there, but the overwhelmingly vast majority of combat roles--not just in war, but defense of a village/house/castle/large track of land--were held by men. Like I stated earlier, it's all about biology.

This is all nothing more than a political move to shut up feminists. I have yet to speak to a female that thinks other females should be in combat roles.

My 2 cents, anyways.

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#1740 - 08/20/15 09:18 AM Re: Women joining Air Force Special Operations Units, your thoughts? [Re: denroy17]
Yukon Offline
Operator

Registered: 11/16/14
Posts: 884
Loc: Anchorage AK
She has very few examples. Further no criteria disclosure of what success and excelled in the study is provided, so the whole assertion is meaningless.

Unfortunately I have obligations not to disclose much of what I heard about the study and the volunteer participants performances which does give substance to determiner if success was achieved by the participants and if any of them actually excelled.

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#1751 - 08/22/15 09:44 AM Re: Women joining Air Force Special Operations Units, your thoughts? [Re: Yukon]
AStelmack Offline
FNG

Registered: 08/14/15
Posts: 19
Loc: Grand Forks AFB, ND
Understandable. Maybe I'm illiterate, but I've yet to read literature boasting women's success throughout the ages of victories won, other than the exceptional few. Do you have any suggested readings? I need more books, anyways.

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#1752 - 08/22/15 11:05 AM Re: Women joining Air Force Special Operations Units, your thoughts? [Re: AStelmack]
Yukon Offline
Operator

Registered: 11/16/14
Posts: 884
Loc: Anchorage AK
Originally Posted By: AStelmack
Do you have any suggested readings? I need more books, anyways.
Unfortunately I do not. There are books of such women to be found, but care must be taken to distinguish individual feats of daring as a combative from feats of leading others in combat. There are examples of both to be found.

Unfortunately, the further back beyond the Twentieth Century (The period between January 1, 1901 and December 31, 2000, inclusive) in history one goes to research, the certainty of much of what is written is undermined by lack of directly observed and written by the observer reputable evidence.

For example searching "female pirates, in internet search engines brings up several did actually live and do female historical figures.

Some of whom very little is actually known about their deeds and accomplishments other than rumors and hearsay which have inspired many myths and legends about them.

For example two female pirates, Anne Bonny and Mary Reed, both pregnant, were captured in the taking of the same pirate crew and thrown in prison, the what happened to one of them is unknown and subject of much speculation.

Mary Read by most accounts died in prison, but Anne Bonny's fate of either ding in prison or somehow getting out of prison to live another life under another name is subject of much speculation.

Both Mary Read and Anne Bonny are considered to be the most famous -- and ferocious -- women pirates in history, but there is no accounting of how many ships they actually boarded as combatants.

Biography of Mary Read (1690? -1721)

Biography of Anne Bonny (1700-1782, exact dates uncertain)

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#1803 - 09/01/15 02:55 PM Re: Women joining Air Force Special Operations Units, your thoughts? [Re: denroy17]
Yukon Offline
Operator

Registered: 11/16/14
Posts: 884
Loc: Anchorage AK
Female Air Force commandos could see combat by 2018 Tom Vanden Brook, USA TODAY 3:07 p.m. EDT September 1, 2015

WASHINGTON — The Air Force could field its first female commandos by 2018 following a months-long review of physical standards required for its 4,000 special operators, according to military officials.

The military services have until the end of this month to petition Defense Secretary Ash Carter for an exception to allowing women into ground combat roles. By Jan. 1, all of the military's jobs, including special operations, will be open to women unless Carter grants an exception.

"My best bet is if the Secretary of Defense opens up the career field in January, two-plus years from then we'll see Air Force women in (special operations) career fields," said Brig. Gen. Brian Kelly, a top Air Force official for personnel.

Barriers to women in combat have been toppling in recent weeks. Two female soldiers graduated from the Army's demanding Ranger school. Adm. Jonathan Greenert, the chief of naval operations, also said his service plans to accept women who can complete the Navy's grueling training to become SEALs. And a Defense official, familiar with the issue but who was not authorized to speak publicly, told USA TODAY that it is unlikely that any of the services will be granted an exception.

The 4,097 Air Force positions in six fields closed to women represent a fraction of the 240,000 male-only military jobs in all the services. But they have outsize significance because if women meet the demands for the highly selective commando units, they'll likely pass muster for the infantry, armor and artillery units. Those fields hold the vast majority of jobs off limits to women.

Air Force officials, commandos and scientists will develop recommendations for new standards based on 39 physical tests that reflect the tasks demanded of its special operators, including pararescue jumpers, highly trained airmen who retrieve troops trapped behind enemy lines, Kelly said.

Currently, pararescue jumpers must meet standards that include timed tests for running 1.5 miles, swimming on and under water, 10 pull-ups in one minute, 54 sit-ups in two minutes, and 52 push-ups in two minutes, according to an Air Force fact sheet.

Thus far 71 women airmen have taken the new tests and many have performed well, leading Kelly to predict women special operators could begin performing missions as soon as 2018. It would take up to two years additional because the training to become an Air Force special operator, including emergency medicine, is extensive.

Kelly was quick to note that the recommended new tests will not diminish the standards demanded of Air Force special operators. The testing is based on "what's required on battlefield." All told about 200 airmen took part in the testing at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland.

"Are you lowering standards? No," Kelly said. "The standards are tied to the operation."

Lt. Col. Travis Woodworth, an Air Force special operations officer who worked on the study to develop the standards, said the commandos who took part demanded tough training requirements.

"From an operational perspective, our bottom line is not to decrease the standards as they currently exist," he said.

One of the tests requires an airman to lift and carry 110 pounds as part of two-person team to mimic evacuating a wounded 220-pound service member. That has to be accomplished while wearing up to 60 pounds of protective gear, including vest, rifle and helmet, and additional gear weighing up to 80 pounds. The weight has to be hauled up the ramp of cargo plane or helicopter.

"That's a pretty good replication of what we have downrange," Woodworth said.

A female Air Force captain who took part in the study predicted women would be able to qualify to become special operators. She spoke on condition of anonymity because she was not authorized to speak about the tests publicly.

She's 6-foot-1, fit and athletic. Runs carrying weight and climbing over obstacles were not a problem, she said, adding some of the tasks "any girl could do." More problematic for her were tests that required pull-ups.

"If I really had my heart set on it, I'd go out and train and I'd make sure I could do all those tests," she said. "It's not impossible. If you wanted to do it, I think you could train to do any of these tasks."

-----
The informing of --"Air Force officials, commandos and scientists will develop recommendations for new standards based on 39 physical tests that reflect the tasks demanded of its special operators" -- is correct and accurate.

The suggesting of--Thus far 71 women airmen have taken the new tests and many have performed well-- is dependent on if well means performance met requirements or not. No data is provided to evaluate what performed well is and isn't, however the critical information lacking is what did the results of the 39 physical tests substantiate concerning the current standards and what changes will be implements to distance to time running and swimming standards and number of calisthenics repetitions (sit-ups, push-ups, pull-ups/chin-ups) and whether other calisthenics needed to be added to the test.

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#1808 - 09/02/15 03:04 PM Re: Women joining Air Force Special Operations Units, your thoughts? [Re: denroy17]
Yukon Offline
Operator

Registered: 11/16/14
Posts: 884
Loc: Anchorage AK
Gender barrier removed on future Army Ranger Courses September 2, 2015 By Army Public Affairs

WASHINGTON (September 2, 2015) -- The Army announced today that qualified personnel will be able to attend all future classes of its elite Ranger Course, regardless of gender.

Ranger School is the Army's premier small unit tactics and leadership school. Students who meet the standards of the course earn the Ranger Tab and serve in a variety of units across the Army.

Secretary of the Army John McHugh said, "We must ensure that this training opportunity is available to all soldiers who are qualified and capable and we continue to look for ways to select, train, and retain the best soldiers to meet our nation's needs."

"The Army's number one priority is combat readiness and leader development is a function of combat readiness," said Chief of Staff of Army Gen. Mark A. Milley. "Giving every qualified soldier the opportunity to attend the Ranger Course, the Army's premier small unit leadership school, ensures we are maintaining our combat readiness today, tomorrow and for future generations."

All prerequisites for students attending the Ranger Course remain in effect, to include standards of medical fitness prescribed in Army Regulation 40-501, Chapters 2, 5, and 8. Additional student requirements can be found on the Airborne and Ranger Training Brigade web site at http://www.benning.army.mil/infantry/rtb/.

Additional queries can be directed to LTC Jerry Pionk at 703-692-1281 or by email at jerome.l.pionk.mil@mail.mil.


Army officially opens Ranger School to female soldiers By Michelle Tan, Staff writer 1:21 p.m. EDT September 2, 2015

The Army's elite Ranger School is now open to all qualified soldiers regardless of gender, the service announced Wednesday.

The school had been open only to men until April, when the Army ran a gender-integrated assessment of the course. Nineteen women started the course on April 20.

Capt. Kristen Griest and 1st Lt. Shaye Haver on Aug. 21 became the first women to earn the distinctive black and gold tab when they graduated from Ranger School.

One female soldier from that original group of 19 is still working to earn the tab; she advanced to the Swamp Phase, Ranger School's third and final phase, last weekend.

In its announcement Wednesday, the Army said "qualified personnel will be able to attend all future classes" of Ranger School "regardless of gender."

"We must ensure that this training opportunity is available to all soldiers who are qualified and capable, and we continue to look for ways to select, train, and retain the best soldiers to meet our nation's needs," Army Secretary John McHugh said in a statement.

Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Milley said: "The Army's number one priority is combat readiness, and leader development is a function of combat readiness. Giving every qualified soldier the opportunity to attend the Ranger Course, the Army's premier small unit leadership school, ensures we are maintaining our combat readiness today, tomorrow and for future generations."

The prerequisites for students attending Ranger School remain in effect, including the standards of medical fitness, the Army said in its announcement.

Army Opens Ranger Course to Women By Molly O'Toole, Defense One, 4:58 PM ET, September 2, 2015

One of the military’s most grueling leadership and special forces courses is now officially open to both genders, the Army announced Wednesday.

Just weeks after the first two women graduated from the Army’s Ranger school as part of a pilot program to study the remaining barriers to full gender integration in the military, the Army opened the course to all personnel who qualify.

“The Army’s number one priority is combat readiness and leader development is a function of combat readiness,” Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Milley said in a statement. “Giving every qualified soldier the opportunity to attend the Ranger Course, the Army’s premier small unit leadership school, ensures we are maintaining our combat readiness.”

But a gender gap remains. All women who complete the course will earn the coveted Ranger tab, but — unlike their male counterparts — are not yet allowed to vie for the 75th Ranger Regiment, the unit sent on the most sensitive missions.

That could end as soon as Jan. 1. The services are expected to complete their integration review and report back to Defense Secretary Ash Carter by Oct. 1. If they do not seek, or are not granted, an exemption, the military will open to women all 200,000 positions that remain closed to them on or before the first of the year, including front-line combat and special operations jobs such as the Ranger squad. The Defense Department has opened 111,000 jobs to women since beginning their review in January.

Most of the branches have indicated they will not ask for an out, with the possible exception of the Marine Corps. But on Tuesday, Navy Secretary Ray Mabus made clear the Marine Corps would have to get that ask past his desk — and he’s not inclined to sign off.

“That’s still my call, and I’ve been very public,” Mabus told the Marine Corps Times. “I do not see a reason for an exemption.”

In late August, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert said the service will soon open its elite training school for SEALs to women.

The Army’s Wednesday announcement reiterated that standards will not be lowered to accommodate women — “All prerequisites for students attending the Ranger Course remain in effect” — an effort to assuage those who still do not believe it.

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#1811 - 09/03/15 10:47 AM Re: Women joining Air Force Special Operations Units, your thoughts? [Re: denroy17]
Yukon Offline
Operator

Registered: 11/16/14
Posts: 884
Loc: Anchorage AK
Army removes all restrictions on women attending Ranger SchoolBy Dan Lamothe, The Washington Post, Published: September 2, 2015.

The Army announced Wednesday that it is opening its legendary Ranger School to women on a full-time basis, following the historic graduation last month of two female soldiers.


The school, with headquarters at Fort Benning, Ga., has been a centerpiece of the military's ongoing research on integrating women into more jobs in combat units. Capt. Kristen Griest, 26, a military policy officer, and 1st Lt. Shaye Haver, 25, an Apache helicopter pilot, became the first women to graduate from school Aug. 21, after spending months alongside men enduring the grueling training.

Army Secretary John McHugh said in a statement that the service must ensure that the opportunity afforded to Griest and Haver is available to "all soldiers who are qualified and capable," and that the Army is continuing to assess how to select, train and retain its best soldiers. Gen. Mark A. Milley, the service's top officer, added in the same statement that combat readiness remains the Army's top priority.

"Giving every qualified soldier the opportunity to attend the Ranger Course, the Army's premier small unit leadership school, ensures we are maintaining our combat readiness today, tomorrow and for future generations," Milley said.

The course lasts a minimum of 61 days, and can take substantially longer for anyone who is allowed to "recycle," or try one of the school's phases more than once. Many Ranger students are recycled several times.

The graduation of Griest and Haver has increased pressure on the military to integrate women into more jobs that are still closed, such as infantryman. Pentagon leaders made a landmark decision in January 2013 to open all jobs in the military to women but gave the services until this fall to make recommendations on whether some jobs should remain closed.

Ranger School opened to women for the first time in April, with 20 women qualifying for the course and 19 electing to attempt it. Griest and Haver are the only ones to graduate, although a third woman has advanced to the school's third and final phase at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida and could graduate as soon as Sept. 18. Like Griest and Haver, she is an officer and graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y.

The Army will remove one requirement that Griest, Haver and their female contemporaries in Ranger School had this year: passing a preliminary 17-day Ranger Training and Assessment Course (RTAC) at Fort Benning prior to attending Ranger School. The service required it for women trying out this year but will not do so in the future. Instead, it will be strongly recommended to prepare for Ranger School, just as it is for male servicemembers.

Ranger School has faced scrutiny from some veterans and active-duty troops who are opposed to further integrating women into the military, but its leaders have insisted that they did not lower the standards to allow Griest and Haver to pass.

"We could have invited each of you to guest walk the entire course, and you would still not believe," wrote Maj. Jim Hathaway, the second in command at the Airborne and Ranger Training Brigade that oversees the school in a Facebook post that went viral last month. "We could have video recorded every patrol and you would still say that we 'gave' it away. Nothing we say will change your opinion."


The service chiefs are expected to make their recommendations on what units to keep closed to women in coming days. Milley has not signaled whether he will integrate Special Forces and other elite units, but the bar to get approval to do so is expected to be high.

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#1856 - 09/14/15 09:52 AM Re: Women joining Air Force Special Operations Units, your thoughts? [Re: denroy17]
Yukon Offline
Operator

Registered: 11/16/14
Posts: 884
Loc: Anchorage AK
[AFSOC: Physical standards won't be lowered for women By Jeff Schogol, Staff writer 8:21 a.m. EDT September 14, 2015

This is one in a series of stories featuring Air Force leaders who spoke to Air Force Times about their challenges in advance of the Air Force Association National Convention Sept. 14-16.

An oft-heard concern is that the Air Force will lower the physical standards for special operations career fields to allow women to become tactical air control party airmen, pararescue airmen and other battlefield airmen.

That’s not going to happen, Lt. Gen. Bradley Heithold, head of Air Force Special Operations Command, told Air Force Times.

“The standards will not be lowered to incorporate or integrate women into our formations at U.S.Special Operations Command or in AFSOC — repeat, will not be lowered,” Heithold said.

Right now, six Air Force Specialty Codes are closed to women: special tactics officer and combat rescue officer, as well as the enlisted fields of special operations weather, combat control, pararescue and tactical air control party. A seventh AFSC, special operations weather officer had been closed to women, but that career field is now closed.


“There are currently no special operations weather officers in the Air Force,” said service spokesman Capt. Brooke Brzozowske. “A few months ago, the small career field was absorbed under the larger weather officer career field in order to provide a more viable career path for its officers.”

Over the past year and a half, AFSOC has done a “very thorough and deliberate” review of the requirements for battlefield airmen’s AFSCs, Heithold said.

“It starts with a review of what are the mission profiles that these individuals would be finding themselves in — we call them ‘full mission profiles’ — to [a review of] a set of physical standards that are required to do those full mission profiles, and then down to what are the physical tests that you need,” he said. “We need to validate those tests, so if you can pass the test, theoretically, you can meet the physical standards and, theoretically, you can then accomplish the operational mission that we have come up [with] for those AFSCs.”

In order to become battlefield airmen, women will have to be able to do all the tasks that come with the job, including dragging a wounded comrade who is wearing body armor and other gear, Heithold said.

On June 19, Air Education and Training Command completed two months of testing in which 175 male and female airmen were put through simulations of what battlefield airmen do downrange. In one test, the airmen simulated carrying a litter up a mockup of a C-17 ramp, raising it, holding it and then mounting it on the simulated aircraft. The results will be used to create gender-neutral physical training for special operations.

Heithold will make a recommendation to Army Gen. Joseph Votel, head of U.S. Special Operations Command, on whether any of the AFSCs should remain closed to women, he said. Votel by Sept. 30 will recommend to Defense Secretary Ash Carter whether any SOCOM positions require an exception to the Defense Department policy eliminating gender restrictions on combat jobs. By Jan. 1, all of the military’s jobs, including special operations, will be open to women unless Carter grants an exception.

“Those AFSCs — as far as the secretary of defense is concerned — those AFSCs are open,” Heithold said. “The [Defense] Department then must come in and request any exceptions to that policy.”

The Air Force’s director of military force management policy has said he expects the gender restrictions on the roughly 4,000 positions now closed to women to be gone by 2018.

“My best bet is if the secretary of defense opens up the career field in January, two-plus years from then we’ll see Air Force women in [special operations] career fields,” Brig. Gen. Brian Kelly told USA Today for a Sept. 1 story.

Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Welsh told Air Force Times’ sister publication Defense News that he is open to the idea of women serving in special operations AFSCs, but the decision is not entirely the Air Force’s to make. “Is there a reason a woman can’t do a combat job versus a man? No. could there be reasons the other services feel that it’s not the right environment for a women? I don’t know. Maybe. But there’s certainly nothing from an Air Force perspective that would inhibit it,” he said.

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